Last edited by Fesida
Monday, February 10, 2020 | History

1 edition of The wife drought found in the catalog.

The wife drought

Annabel Crabb

The wife drought

  • 134 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Husbands,
  • Women in public life,
  • Effect of wife"s employment on,
  • Social conditions,
  • Women executives,
  • Work and family,
  • Wives

  • About the Edition

    The Wife Drought is about women, men, family and work. Written in Annabel Crabb"s inimitable style, it"s full of candid and funny stories from the author"s work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of "The Wife" in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of egalitarian Australia.

    Edition Notes

    StatementAnnabel Crabb
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD4904.25 .C73 2014
    The Physical Object
    Pagination282 pages
    Number of Pages282
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26924958M
    ISBN 100857984268
    ISBN 109780857984265
    LC Control Number2015376065
    OCLC/WorldCa910622392

    Viewed one way, this is an unforgivable and continuing annexation of money, power and influence. She moved to The Advertiser's Canberra bureau two years later, having worked for The Advertiser in both state and federal politics, before departing in to move to The Age as a political columnist and correspondent. But there are other things that I think exert an impact on the long-during nature of this breadwinner model. How do we determine the quality of this work, how to we measure the time it should take, or the standards to be achieved? Community DL: Is it time to start looking at other relationship models? Should we start thinking more about community?

    Either that, or working like a lunatic whilst being plagued by personal guilt on one hand and the covert critique of other mothers on the other. How do we change that? But it's not actually a joke. Fellow journo and broadcaster Annabel Crabb has a different take. Thanks to high-achievers like those featured in The Climb, few young women today lack role models in whatever their chosen field might be and there is no evidence of a gender-specific, generation-wide lack of self-belief, ambition or know-how. Or even the extent to which it is a problem.

    These social assumptions not only affect relationships and career growth but hinder the potential economic growth that can be achieved when women and men are happier in their work-family-life balance. Annabel Crabb has not only undertaken significant research, but she offers some fresh thinking about the role of women and child rearing in Australia today. I was somewhat surprised while reading this book to find myself arguing with it, though not necessarily because I disagreed with what Crabb was saying. This does not happen in American couples.


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The wife drought book

The problem, as Crabb sees it, is that any working parent without a "wife" defined here as "a person who pulls back on paid work in order to do more of the unpaid work that accumulates around the home" is at an "urgent practical disadvantage" when competing with a wife-having parent, because the latter has, among other benefits, the ability to work longer hours, spend time networking and focus on their work "to the absolute exclusion of all else".

Rather than a shout of rage, The Wife Drought is the thoughtful, engaging catalyst for a conversation that's long overdue. A lot of the material about gender and work is stuff I've heard before - and I can understand people wanting to roll their eyes and shout "Yes yes, I know! Our desire for spotless homes and clean safe children has had costs in immunity restrictions and less childhood experiences exploring the neighbourhood.

Annabel Crabb manages to deliver a humorous and insightful perspective of the pressures faced by women and men in the professional spheres.

Book Review: The Wife Drought

Written in Annabel Crabb's inimitable style, it's full of candid and funny stories from the author's work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of 'The Wife' in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of egalitarian Australia.

Annabel Crabb is a funny, impassioned writer, on this and many other topics, and she has backed up her fascinating anecdotes from the famous and not so famous with an impressive array of evidence and statistics.

Continuing the theme of social pressure and expectations, in Chapter 8, Role Reversal, Crabb documents how women and men meet a barrage of implicit and explicit criticism if they manage their affairs such that women remain at work while their husbands carry the load at home.

The Wife Drought is about women, men, family and work. Crabb offers facts, personal experiences, interviews and statistics with a flair and passion that makes the information understandable and motivational. And yet this asset keeps their lives turning over more efficiently than an accommodating accountant or the most obliging of personal assistants.

In among lots of stats and case studies, Crabb writes warmly about her own sometimes chaotic family life and I suspect she'd be in full agreement with Doogue's observation that, as a working mother, "your whole notion of time management has to shift, and you devise clever, sometimes ingenious, solutions that had never dawned on you previously".

As Crabb convincingly argues, unless more men step up as participants rather than observers in the struggle to combine parenthood and paid work, we'll remain stuck. Having a spouse who takes care of things at home is a Godsend on the domestic front. The elevation of Donald Trump from talented freelance bottom-pincher to Leader of the Free World, substantially powered by angry white dudes in Michigan, has created, internationally, a mood of fear and uncertainty among the existing political class.

Category: Social Science. In Chapter 6, Crabb documents various, inconclusive and problematic methods which might be employed to determine the value of the housework and childcare that women do. Black Inc. As such, it will be an essential resource for students and scholars of media and communication studies, urban communication, urban sociology, urban planning and design, architecture, visual cultures, urban geography, art history, politics, cultural studies, anthropology and cultural policy studies, as well as those working with governmental agencies, cultural foundations and institutes, and policy think tanks.

The decision about who is going to go part time when a couple has a baby is explicitly skewed by the likelihood that the guy on average is going to be earning more than the woman.

And what is it like to be a woman without a wife in a challenging job? Meanwhile our gender pay gap has just hit This is despite evidence that more flexible work practices result in more work getting done, not less — and so would be in the interests of employers to encourage this.

But rather than merely talking up how women use their post-baby super-skills Crabb asks why on earth men aren't using theirs: "Of working fathers with a child aged 11 or under, only one in three change their working pattern" and most of those are tinkering around the edges rather than "making significant adjustments of the kind women routinely make … Why should we so readily agree for men to be painted out of the picture?

Three years later Crabb travelled to the United Kingdom and spent several years there working as the London correspondent for the Sunday Age and Sun-Herald, and acting as an occasional and largely non-political correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald.

In the olden days, wives were usually women.'I need a wife' It’s a common joke among women juggling work and family.

The Wife Drought

But it’s not actually a joke. Having a spouse who takes care of things at home is a Godsend on the domestic front. It’s a potent economic asset on the work front. And it’s an advantage enjoyed – even in our modern society – by vastly more men than women. Working women are in an advanced. Description - The Wife Drought by Annabel Crabb 'I need a wife' It?s a common joke among women juggling work and family.

But it?s not actually a joke. Having a spouse who takes care of things at home is a Godsend on the domestic front. Sep 01,  · The Wife Drought is about women, men, family and work. Written in Annabel Crabb’s inimitable style, it’s full of candid and funny stories from the author’s work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of ‘The Wife’ in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of egalitarian hildebrandsguld.com: Random House Australia.

Apr 16,  · The Wife Drought is about women, men, family and work. Written in Annabel Crabb's inimitable style, it's full of candid and funny stories from the author's work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of 'The Wife' in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of /5(3).

Book review: The Wife Drought, Annabel Crabb; The Climb, Geraldine Doogue

Sep 12,  · The Wife Drought is another example. Annabel deals with the serious topics of equity, relationships, raising of children and work life in a light way. She makes the point that modern life is complex but we all benefit by accepting change.

And, no one should be /5(41). Oct 01,  · The Wife Drought examines the lack of progress in balancing men’s and women’s roles at home and how domestic arrangements feed into professional advancement. Drawing on personal anecdotes, careful research and her insider’s view into Canberra politics and policymaking, Crabb approaches her topic with unfiltered candour/5(46).